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ORTHOPAEDICS :: Growth-Related Disorders

Lordosis

What is lordosis?

A normal spine, when viewed from behind appears straight. However, a spine affected by lordosis shows evidence of a curvature of the back bones (vertebrae) in the lower back area, giving the child a "swayback" appearance.

Illustration of a child with lordosis
Click Image to Enlarge

What causes lordosis?

The cause of lordosis is unknown. However, lordosis may be associated with poor posture, a congenital (present at birth) problem with the vertebrae, neuromuscular problems, back surgery, or a hip problem.

What are the symptoms of lordosis?

Each child may experience symptoms differently. The major clinical feature of lordosis is a prominence of the buttocks. Symptoms will vary depending if lordosis occurs with other defects, such as muscular dystrophy, developmental dysplasia of the hip, or neuromuscular disorders.

Back pain, pain down the legs, and changes in bowel and bladder habits are not commonly associated with lordosis. A child experiencing these types of symptoms requires further medical evaluation by a physician.

The symptoms of lordosis may resemble other spinal conditions or deformities, or may be a result of an injury or infection. Always consult your child's physician for a diagnosis.

How is lordosis diagnosed?

The physician makes the diagnosis of lordosis with a complete medical history of the child, physical examination, and diagnostic tests. Your child's physician obtains a complete prenatal and birth history of the child and asks if other family members are known to have lordosis.

Diagnostic procedures may include the following:

  • x-rays - a diagnostic test which uses invisible electromagnetic energy beams to produce images of internal tissues, bones, and organs onto film. This test is used to measure and evaluate the curve. With the use of a full-spine x-ray, the physician or radiologist measures the angle of the spinal curve. A determination for treatment can often be made based on this measurement.
  • bone scans - a nuclear imaging method to evaluate any degenerative and/or arthritic changes in the joints; to detect bone diseases and tumors; to determine the cause of bone pain or inflammation. This test is to rule out any infection or fractures.
  • magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) - a diagnostic procedure that uses a combination of large magnets, radiofrequencies, and a computer to produce detailed images of organs and structures within the body. This test is done to rule out any associated abnormalities of the spinal cord and nerves.
  • computed tomography scan (Also called a CT or CAT scan.) - a diagnostic imaging procedure that uses a combination of x-rays and computer technology to produce cross-sectional images (often called slices), both horizontally and vertically, of the body. A CT scan shows detailed images of any part of the body, including the bones, muscles, fat, and organs. CT scans are more detailed than general x-rays.
  • blood tests

Early detection of lordosis is important for successful treatment. Pediatricians or family physicians, and even some school programs, routinely look for signs that lordosis may be present.

Treatment of lordosis:

Specific treatment for lordosis will be determined by your child's physician based on:

  • your child's age, overall health, and medical history
  • the extent of the condition
  • your child's tolerance for specific medications, procedures, or therapies
  • expectations for the course of the condition
  • your opinion or preference

The goal of treatment is to stop the progression of the curve and prevent deformity. Management of lordosis will depend upon the cause of the lordosis. Simple exercises may be sufficient if lordosis is associated with poor posture. However, lordosis occurring as a result of a hip problem may be treated as a part of the hip problem.

Long-term outlook for a child with lordosis:

The management of lordosis is individualized for each child depending on his/her age, amount of curvature, and amount of skeletal growth remaining. Lordosis will require frequent examinations by your child's physician to monitor the curve as your child grows and develops. Early detection is important.

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It is important to remember the health information found on this website is for reference only not intended to replace the advice and guidance of your healthcare provider. Always seek the advice of your physician with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your physician or 911 immediately.
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