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COMMON INJURY/POISON :: Foreign Bodies in Ear, Nose, and Airway

Insects in the Ear

Insects may fly into the ear and become trapped when a child is playing outdoors. Sometimes, the insect dies after entering the ear; other times, it may remain alive and attempt to work its way back out of the ear. In either case, the insect can cause fear and discomfort for a child and the insect should be removed immediately.

First-aid for insects in the ear:

  • Calm your child and let him/her know you can help.
  • Do not attempt to remove the insect by poking it with a cotton swab or similar probe. This may push the insect farther into the ear or cause damage to the middle ear and eardrum.
  • Tilt your child's head to the side and gently shake (do not hit) it.
  • If your child has tubes in his/her ears or has a history of ear problems call your child's physician immediately for further treatment recommendations.
  • If your child does not have tubes or ear problems:
    • If you think the insect is still alive and it does not come out with gentle head shaking, pour a small amount of vegetable or baby oil into the ear canal. This will usually suffocate the insect.
    • If you think the insect is dead and it does not come out with gentle head shaking, pour a small amount of warm water into the ear canal to flush it out.

When should I call my child's physician?

Specific treatment for insects in the ear that require more than minor treatment at home will be determined by your child's physician. In general, call your child's physician:

  • to have the insect removed if it does not come out after shaking or irrigation. Insects are able to cause damage to the inside of the ear by stinging or scratching the eardrum.
  • if you are able to remove only parts or pieces of the insect.
  • if your child develops signs of infection such as a fever or foul smell or drainage from the ear.

Click here to view the
Online Resources of Common Childhood Injuries & Poisonings

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It is important to remember the health information found on this website is for reference only not intended to replace the advice and guidance of your healthcare provider. Always seek the advice of your physician with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your physician or 911 immediately.
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