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ALLERGY AND ASTHMA :: Foods

Egg Allergy Diet

General guidelines for egg allergy:

The key to an allergy-free diet is to avoid feeding your child the foods or products containing the food he/she is allergic to. The items that your child is allergic to are called allergens.

Eggs are a commonly used food that may cause food sensitivity reactions. Parents of children with egg sensitivity may not find it difficult to eliminate visible eggs, but may not be aware of the variety of food products that contain eggs. In order to eliminate foods that contain eggs, it is important to read food labels.

FOODS

ALLOWED

NOT ALLOWED

Breads & Starches Plain enriched white, whole wheat, rye bread, or buns (without egg products or brushing with egg for glazing)

Biscuits made from egg-free baking powder

Crackers and homemade breads made with allowed ingredients

Most cereals and grains, such as rice

Commercially prepared pancakes, waffles, donuts, and muffins

Zwieback, soda crackers, bread crumbs, and pretzels

Egg noodles or pasta

Baking mixes, fritter batter or batter-fried foods, French toast

Fried rice containing eggs

Any commercial bread or bread product made with egg products or brushed with egg for glazing

Vegetables All fresh, frozen, dried, or canned Any vegetables prepared in a casserole or with sauces or breading that contain eggs in any form (such as hollandaise sauce, vegetable soufflé or batter-fried vegetables)
Fruit Fresh, frozen, dried, or canned fruits and juices Any fruit served with a sauce containing egg such as custard sauce

Fruit whips

Meat, Meat Substitutes & Eggs Baked, broiled, boiled, or roasted beef, veal, pork, ham, chicken, turkey, lamb, fish, or organ meats

Meats breaded and fried with egg-free breading

Eggs in any form, from any animal including egg powders, or commercial egg substitutes

Soufflés

Commercially breaded meats, fish, or poultry

Meatballs, meat loaf, croquettes, some sausages

Milk & Milk Products Whole, low-fat or skim milk, buttermilk

Cheese, cottage cheese, or yogurt

Cocomalt, eggnog, malted beverages, boiled custard, Ovaltine, protein drinks containing egg, egg products or egg protein

Pudding, custard, or ice cream

Soups & Combination Foods Soup or broth prepared with allowed ingredients Any stock cleared with egg (consommé, broth, bouillon)

Turtle or mock turtle soup, egg drop soup, any soup with egg noodles or macaroni

Prepared entrees or combination foods that contain eggs in any form

Desserts & Sweets Gelatin, fruit crisp, popsicles, fruit ice

Homemade desserts prepared with allowed ingredients

Hard candy

Cakes, cookies, cream-filled pies, meringues, whips, custard, pudding, ice cream, sherbet

Chocolate candy made with cream or fondant fillings, marshmallow candy, divinity, fudge, icing or frostings, chocolate sauce

Dessert powders

Pie crust or jelly beans brushed with egg whites

Fat-free desserts made with Simplesse™

Fats & Oils Butter, margarine, vegetable oil, shortening, cream gravy, oil & vinegar dressing, eggless mayonnaise, bacon Salad dressings and mayonnaise (unless egg free)

Tartar sauce

Fat-free products made with Simplesse™

Beverages Water, fruit juice, fruit drinks

Tea

Carbonated beverages

Root beer, wine, or coffee if clarified with egg
Condiments & Miscellaneous Sugar, honey, jam, jelly

Salt, spices

Cream sauces made with eggs

Hollandaise sauce, tartar sauce, marshmallow sauce

Baking powder containing egg white or egg albumin

Any product made with Simplesse™

How to read a label for an egg-free diet:

Be sure to avoid foods that contain any of the following ingredients:

  • albumin
  • egg whites
  • egg yolk
  • dried egg
  • egg powder
  • egg solids
  • egg substitutes
  • eggnog
  • globulin
  • livetin
  • lysozyme (used in Europe)
  • mayonnaise
  • meringue
  • ovalbumin
  • ovomucin
  • ovomucoid
  • ovovitellin
  • Simplesse™

Other possible sources of eggs or egg products:

  • A shiny glaze or yellow baked good may indicate the presence of egg.
  • Simplesse™ is used as a fat substitute and is made from either egg or milk protein.
  • Egg whites and shells may be used as clarifying agents in soup stocks, consommés, bouillons, and coffees.

Caution should be used when consuming these products.

Information for using egg substitutes:

For each egg, one of the following may be substituted in recipes:

  • 1 tsp baking powder, 1 Tbsp water, 1 Tbsp vinegar
  • 1 tsp yeast dissolved in 1/4 cup warm water
  • 1 Tbsp apricot puree
  • 1 1/2 Tbsp water, 1 1/2 Tbsp oil, 1 tsp baking powder
  • 1 packet gelatin, 2 Tbsp warm water (do not mix until ready to use)

Click here to view the
Online Resources of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology

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It is important to remember the health information found on this website is for reference only not intended to replace the advice and guidance of your healthcare provider. Always seek the advice of your physician with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your physician or 911 immediately.
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