CHOC Children's

Eye Examinations and Visual Screening

Picture of eye chart and pair of eyeglasses

When are eye examinations necessary?

Any problems a child may experience with his/her vision may disrupt the development of visual pathways to the brain. A critical stage of visual binocular development occurs between birth and age 3 to 6 months, during which time the brain must receive clear visual messages from both eyes. Early detection and treatment can prevent loss of vision, learning difficulties, and delayed development.

The American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO) and the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) have recommended the following screening stages:

  • newborn - All newborns are examined in the nursery for eye infections, abnormal light reflexes, and other eye disorders, such as cataracts.
  • six months - Visual screening of infants should be performed during the well-baby visits, particularly checking for how the eyes work together.
  • 3 to 4 years - Formal visual acuity tests should be performed.
  • 5 years and older - Annual visual screening tests by the pediatricians and eye examinations as necessary.

Children often cannot tell you when they are having problems with their vision. Visual screening helps to identify those children who may need further eye examinations and testing. The earlier the detection of vision problems, the more successful the treatment. Always discuss eye examinations and visual screening with your child's physician.

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Online Resources of Eye Care

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It is important to remember the health information found on this website is for reference only not intended to replace the advice and guidance of your healthcare provider. Always seek the advice of your physician with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your physician or 911 immediately.

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